Oddly Shaped Pegs

An inquiry into the Nature and Causes of Stuff

A private event

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It wasn’t exactly in stealth mode, but I heard about Data Privacy Day 2010 only after it happened.

Born of an effort to promote awareness of data privacy issues by the non-profit The Privacy Projects, this year’s celebration (?) included events at a several universities. Most interesting to me was a roundtable discussion at UC Berkeley sponsored by the Federal Trade Commission. I’m skeptical about how much the federal government will do about protecting privacy, but it is good to see serious interest.

This year’s events concentrated on consumer privacy and its apparent conflict with emerging business models. My recent research has been on handling privacy concerns in “statistical databases” — large collections of sensitive information that we would like to open up to wider scrutiny and analysis. Unsurprisingly, I would like to see “Data Privacy Day” also cover this aspect of data privacy. There is a danger, though, that the topic becomes too diffuse. What are really the most pressing privacy issues, and what should a broad “data privacy” awareness event cover?

UPDATE (2/3/10): Arvind was part of the roundtable and has some notes on it at 33 bits. He includes there some interesting comments on academics’ participation in policy discussions. I’ll add only that at Penn State, quite a few faculty members are involved in policy, but mostly away from the public eye. For example, two weeks ago I met with a White House official about privacy issues in the release of government data sets; I’ve also been involved in (executive branch) panels on government handling of biometric data. However, it is true that public participation in policy discussions by academics is limited. That may be because many academics realize they would make bad politicians; as Arvind notes, misaligned incentives also play a role.

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Written by adamdsmith

February 2, 2010 at 2:02 pm

Posted in Data privacy

Tagged with ,

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