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TCC 2016-B Call For Papers

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(Posting this here as a backup, since the main TCC website is temporarily down. The submission server is up and running though.)

The Fourteenth Theory of Cryptography Conference will be held in Beijing, China, sponsored by the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR). Papers presenting original research on foundational and theoretical aspects of cryptography are sought. For more information about TCC, see the TCC manifesto.

Submission Deadline  Friday, May 20, 2016, Anywhere on Earth
Notification of Decision  August 1, 2016
Proceedings Version Due  August 23, 2016
Conference  November 1-3, 2016

The Theory of Cryptography Conference deals with the paradigms, approaches, and techniques used to conceptualize natural cryptographic problems and provide algorithmic solutions to them. More specifically, the scope of the conference includes, but is not limited to the:

  • Study of known paradigms, approaches, and techniques, directed towards their better understanding and utilization,
  • Discovery of new paradigms, approaches and techniques that overcome limitations of the existing ones,
  • Formulation and treatment of new cryptographic problems.
  • Study of notions of security and relations among them,
  • Modeling and analysis of cryptographic algorithms, and
  • Study of the complexity assumptions used in cryptography.

The Theory of Cryptography Conference is dedicated to providing a premier venue for the dissemination of results within its scope. The conference aims to provide a meeting place for researchers and to be instrumental in shaping the identity of the theoretical cryptography community.

Instructions for Authors

The submission should begin with a title, followed by the names, affiliations and contact information of all authors, and a short abstract. It should contain a scholarly exposition of ideas, techniques, and results, including motivation and a clear comparison with related work. Submission must be typeset using the Springer LNCS format with page numbers enabled (\pagestyle{plain}). The main body of the submission, including title page and figures, must not exceed 20 pages. In addition, any amount of clearly marked supplementary material and references are allowed. However, reviewers are not required to read or review any supplementary material and submissions are expected to be intelligible and complete without it.

Submissions must not substantially duplicate work that was published elsewhere, or work that any of the authors has submitted in parallel to any other conference or workshop that has proceedings; see the IACR policy on irregular submissions for more information.

At least one author of each accepted paper is required to present the paper at the conference. Authors are strongly encouraged to post full versions of their submissions in a freely accessible online repository, such as the Cryptology ePrint archive. We encourage the authors to post such a version at the time of submission (in which case the authors should provide a link on the title page of their submission). At the minimum, we expect that authors of accepted papers will post a full version of their papers by the camera-ready deadline. Abstracts of accepted papers will be made public by the PC following the notification.

Contacting the Authors

At submission time, authors must provide one or several email addresses for corresponding authors. Throughout the review period, at least one corresponding author is expected to be available to receive and quickly answer questions (via email) that arise about their submissions.

Submission instructions

Papers must be submitted electronically through the submission web page. The authors are allowed to revise the paper any number of times before the submission deadline, and only the latest submitted version will be seen by the PC. Therefore, the authors are advised not to wait until the last moment for the initial submission.

Best student paper award

This prize is for the best paper authored solely by students, where a student is a person that is considered a student by the respective institution at the time of the paper’s submission. Eligibility must be indicated at the time of submission (using a checkbox in the submission form). The program committee may decline to make the award, or may split it among several papers.

Proceedings

Proceedings will be published in Springer-Verlag’s Lecture Notes in Computer Science Series and will be available at the conference. Instructions for preparing the final proceedings version will be sent to the authors of accepted papers. The final copies of the accepted papers will be due on the camera-ready deadline listed above. This is a strict deadline, and authors should prepare accordingly.

Program Committee

Masayuki Abe (NTT)
Divesh Aggarwal (EPFL)
Andrej Bogdanov (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
Elette Boyle (IDC Herzliya)
Anne Broadbent (uOttawa)
Christina Brzuska (TU Hamburg)
David Cash (Rutgers)
Alessandro Chiesa (UC Berkeley)
Kai-Min Chung (Academia Sinica)
Nico Döttling (UC Berkeley)
Sergey Gorbunov (U. Waterloo)
Martin Hirt (ETH Zurich) — Co-chair
Abhishek Jain (Johns Hopkins)
Huijia Lin (UC Santa Barbara)
Hemanta K. Maji (Purdue)
Adam O’Neill (Georgetown)
Rafael Pass (Cornell Tech)
Krzysztof Pietrzak (IST Austria)
Manoj Prabhakaran (U. Illinois, Urbana Champaign)
Renato Renner (ETH Zurich)
Alon Rosen (IDC Herzliya)
abhi shelat (U. Virginia)
Adam Smith (Penn State) — Co-chair
John Steinberger (Tsinghua)
Jonathan Ullman (Northeastern)
Vinod Vaikuntanathan (MIT)
Muthuramakrishnan Venkitasubramaniam (U. Rochester)

Please send questions to tcc2016b.chairs@gmail.com

Conference Honorary Chair

Andrew Chi-Chih Yao (IIIS, Tsinghua University, China)

General Chair

Dongdai Lin (SKLOIS, Institute of Information Engineering, CAS, China)

TCC Steering Committee Members

Mihir Bellare, Ivan Damgård, Shafi Goldwasser, Shai Halevi (chair), Russell Impagliazzo, Ueli Maurer, Silvio Micali, Moni Naor, and Tatsuaki Okamoto.

TCC web site: http://www.iacr.org/workshops/tcc/

 

Written by adamdsmith

May 2, 2016 at 9:02 am

Posted in Conferences, Uncategorized

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TCC 2016-B: Deadline May 20

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TCC (the Theory of Cryptography Conference) is moving to a late Fall schedule, so this year the conference will occur twice! TCC 2016-A happened already, and TCC 2016-B will happen in November in Beijing.

Deadline is coming up — May 20, 2016.
http://tcc2016b.sklois.cn/call_for_papers.html

(Backup posted on this blog.)
“Theory of cryptography” is broad, and should really be interpreted as “mathematical aspects of information security”. That includes everything from mainstream cryptographic topics (encryption, zero-knowledge and, more recently, obfuscation) to data privacy, information theoretic secrecy, relevant combinatorics and number theory, logic and programming language theory. Experimental work is also welcome to the extent it is driven by and informs our mathematical understanding of a problem.
Send your awesome papers!
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Written by adamdsmith

April 27, 2016 at 9:06 am

Posted in Conferences, Uncategorized

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ICITS 2012 — playing with the format

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I am the program chair for this year’s ICITS, the International Conference on Information-Theoretic Security. (The acronym is admittedly a bit of a mouthful. I like “ickets” as the pronunciation. That way, papers at ICITS are “pickets”, talks there are “tickets”, you get the idea.) ICITS will be held in Montreal right before CRYPTO, August 15-17, 2012.

ICITS occupies an interesting spot at the intersection of a few different fields: crypto, information theory, quantum computing and combinatorics. In the past, ICITS has worked like a normal computer science conference: papers are reviewed carefully, papers cannot have appeared at other conferences or journals, etc. However, because ICITS serves several different communities, the format has sometimes cost it good papers: some are lost to more specific or better-known venues in computer science, others are lost because conference “publication” doesn’t fit well with the culture in other fields, etc.

So to try to broaden participation and make the conference more scientifically useful, we’re shaking up the format this year with a two-track submission process. The “conference” track will operate like a traditional conference with the usual review process and published proceedings. The “workshop” track will operate more like an informal workshop, without published proceedings. Submissions to the former track will follow a traditional page-limited format. Submissions to the latter are much more flexible in format (they can range from full papers or to extended abstracts), and may consist of previously published papers or works in progress. For example, the workshop track would be a great place to come present your Crypto/Eurocrypt, QIP or ISIT paper to the other communities that work on info-theoretic security.

You can see the call for papers if you’re curious about the process. But most importantly, get your papers ready for submission! The deadlines are

  • March 12 for the regular track and
  • April 9 for workshop papers.

In addition to the contributed papers we will have a great slate of invited speakers from a broad range of disciplines. And did I mention that the program committee rocks?

Of course, the best part of this is that ICITS will be in Montreal in the summer time. Despite its French character, not all of Montreal goes on vacation in August (in fact, the city does shut down for two weeks, the “construction holidays”, that will be over by the time ICITS hits town). There are festivals, tasty food, nice weather and, for me, lots of friends and family to see.

So submit your papers! And attend!

Written by adamdsmith

February 9, 2012 at 12:05 am

Je m’en (af)fiche

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Tucked neatly between (US) Independence Day and (French) Bastille Day this year was YESS, a joint French-US workshop for “young scientists and engineers”, held at the French embassy. This year’s theme was Identity Management, which largely meant biometrics, database privacy and anonymous communication. I wasn’t sure from the initial invitation how serious the whole thing was (note to organizers: explicit mention of freely flowing champagne in a workshop invitation is appealing, but a little suspicious), but it turned out to be a great workshop.

Ok, almost great. There were a number of program/department overviews by French and US officials, some of which made me feel like Bill Gasarch did in this picture. (To the speakers’ credit, no one made jokes about freedom fries even though fries were served in the Embassy cafeteria.) But the scientific talks were interesting, and I got to meet a cross-section of French researchers I don’t normally interact with. I also learned a lot about Tor and it’s role in Iran from Roger Dingledine.

I walked away from “YESS” with a few distinct impressions.

  • It is extremely difficult to give a program or departmental overview that is fun to listen to.
  • The French are a few years into the process of switching to a competitive, proposal-driven mode of funding research.
  • A significant fraction of the biometrics/security community read the fuzzy extractor papers and got the point (in a nutshell: it is possible to be rigorous about the security properties of biometric systems). Unfortunately, that fraction is a lot less than 1.
  • Making scientific posters is a questionable use of anyone’s time.

The first point is self-explanatory, I’ll save the second for a future discussion and I haven’t figured out what to make of the third.

But the posters! Called post-ère in French (why not affiche? Nobody knew.), the scientific poster lies somewhere between talk slides and a regular written article. In its ideal form it provides both a quick overall impression of a work, for the casual passer-by, and more in-depth explanations, for the viewer with more time and patience. In practice, it is  hacked together in a hurry and provides neither. For a typical failure, see my own feeble attempt here.

However, the real problem with posters is that even the good ones don’t seem to get read. It is almost always more compelling to listen to a bad talk than to read a good poster. What gives? By all rights, a poster session should be more interesting than a typical session of talks since you can allocate your time and attention more flexibly. But it doesn’t work — posters just don’t seem to make people care.

What is the best format for allowing everyone to get a short overviews of all the papers, and also have the option of learning more about a given paper? Is the web pushing science into a post-post-ère era? Or do I just need to learn to read?

I am troubled by this since the IPAM workshop I’m co-organizing will have time for a relatively small number of talks, but we want to give all attendees a chance to present their ideas. The initial plan was to have a poster session, but I am having my doubts. Maybe a rump session with many five-minute talks is more effective, or  perhaps a combination of the two (five-minute poster ads)?

Written by adamdsmith

July 29, 2009 at 9:36 pm

Posted in Conferences